× Tips and techniques for getting the most out of surfskiing.

sprint kayak versus surfski technique?

3 months 3 days ago #38384 by Charivari
Is there some differences between the technique of the surfski paddling and sprint kayak paddling?
I would think, that only the upper hand is more near to the body at the SK, but I'm not sure.
e.g.:

Oskar Chalupsky


Sprint kayak technique

Sailing since 1985, Laser, Cat.
Round the world trip by bike, 1990.
Sea-kayak from Vancouver to Alaska, 1990.
A-Cat, Bimare, 1990.
Coastal Rowing, Virus, 1992.
Fyling A-Cat, DNA F1, 2018.
New Coastal Rowing Boat, Volans, 2019.
First Surfski experience, material rent, 2020.
First Surfski, NK61, 2021...

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

3 months 2 days ago #38385 by SurfskiEstonia

Not a sprint athlete or anything close to that, but I think the sprint technique is fine-tuned to absolute perfection for transferring full power to propel forward during a relatively short period of time/ distance. Surfski is more of an endurance sport (with elements of HIIT) and, in addition to preserving energy, it demands caution to prevent injuries from bracing etc.

So IMO, the high elbow technique is clearly a winner in going fastest on flat water and all adjustments to it on surfski are made to preserve energy and prevent injuries:)

Current: Carbonology Boost double, Jantex Gamma Mid
Previous: Nelo Ocean Ski L, Jantex Gamma Rio Large Minus
The following user(s) said Thank You: Charivari

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

3 months 2 days ago #38389 by waverider
With flatwater sprint (and even k1 marathon) boats the only instability is your own balance and technique on the natural tippiness of the boat. On surfski there are constant changing stability issues due to wave action, ie not as predictable.  As a result reactive balance and bracing is often required. lowering COG and keeping blade closer to water is common, hence lower paddle angle is common. A constant technical forward stroke is all important on a k1,  Being adaptable to ever changing conditions is the go on a ski,. Typically shorter paddles and smaller blades help with this flexibility. Downwind paddling will be much more start stop, quick slow, rather than a constant steady rhythm.

They are compatible sports but dont expect to be able to howl down the wind just because you have K1 mastered, nor expect to be even competent on a sprint k1 simply because you are comfortable on a ski, different beasts that take time to learn.

If you watch the coaching vids by oscar chalupski you will see his obvious background in surfski downwind paddling, whereas Ivan Lawlers vids come from a flatwater K1 back ground. The physics are the same but the adaptations are modified for each aspect.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Charivari

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

3 months 2 days ago #38390 by waverider
In the vid by oscar, you will see his elbow tucked in, this is probably more than most do, but the principle is that all he needs do is lower the forearm and its straight into a skim brace, something that is not required in sprint where the strongest positioning for the upper arm is the press up position (as per Ivan lawler)

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

3 months 2 days ago #38392 by mrcharly
I was doing quite a bit of flatwater K1. Not athletic, worked and worked on technique and did ok for an unathletic middle-aged guy.

Purity of stroke is *the* most important thing in K1. Locked 'frame' after catch, top hand moves parallel to water. Exit early and clean. Huge amounts of rotation - rotating seats are normal at top level. Smooth, efficient constant power output is key.

Surkski - well, I'm an absolute beginner. flexibility of stroke is important - you might need to change stroke direction for stability. Smaller blades, shorter paddles.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Charivari

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

3 months 1 day ago #38397 by kwolfe
I'm with mrcharly on this.

K1 technique is to master the art of maximizing power applied to a blade to accelerate a K1 in flat water.  The same stroke could be used in a ski, however you would most likely sacrifice stability.  The ski stroke has to incorporate the fact that you are paddling in moving water which might require a bit of bracing.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Charivari

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Latest Forum Topics

qmento's Avatar

Hydration hose (5 Posts)

1 day 5 hours ago

Well, I am back...sort of :) (3 Posts)

2 days 21 hours ago
Protected by R Antispam